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the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stroer than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the l
evening i'm susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> tom: wall street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus, what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surprise, home depot was the dow's standout. >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the
." sandy has gone. new york tries to get back to life. >> this is crazy. it has taken me 45 minutes just to get right there from third street. i have never seen traffic like this in my life. >> on the campaign trail, though, it is full speed ahead. with five days ago, the campaign -- the campaigners are covering the country in search of every vote. and new wealth is opening a great divide for the next generation of leaders. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. three days after super storm sandy hit the eastern united states, the death toll has climbed to more than 80. 4 million homes and businesses are still without power. slowly, though, new york is trying to come back to life. some subways are rolling again, but getting around by car takes forever. the bbc took to the streets. >> taxi delays greeted commuters this morning at the river crossings. it was the journey from hell. this was the bus queue in brookline -- in brooklyn. spare a thought for those who took a car. a painful crawl that tested the patience of even the most hardened new york
that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates th
and new jersey: another storm takes aim at the region, as sandy's recovery slogs on, and the hunt for fuel heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see n
. >> this week on "inside washington," sandy's brutal october surprised. >> i want to thank the president personally. >> how many votes are these photographs worth? how do you compete with the natural disaster? climate change? neither candidate wants to go near its. the new unemployment number -- how will it play in the polling place? jeep jobs in china flap. >> sold chrysler to italians who are going to build jeeps in china. >> an outrageous lie. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we thought this is going to be a special preelection broadcast, that all we would have to do is handicapped the election. then along came hurricane sandy. in politics, a wise man told me once that you can never see around the corner. i don't want to minimize the tragic human dimensions of this giant storm and its aftermath, but this is a political program and the election is next tuesday, so here goes. we start with new jersey gov. christie prior to hurricane sandy. >> send you back to chicago -- give you the plane trip back to chicago you have earned. i cannot thank the presid
economy slows down, u.s. exports may follow suit. hurricane sandy showed up in the latest report on jobless claims, making them artificially low. initial claims for unemployment benefits dropped by 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 355,000 at the end of last week. the number is expected to be revised higher as more data is collected. the labor department says one state filed fewer claims because of power outages, while the storm boosted claims in other states where more people looking for relief. later in the program, we'll look at sandy's impact on retailers. >> tom: the biggest bank in america has the okay now from uncle sam to pay back shareholders. jpmorgan will be allowed to restart a stock buyback plan early next year. like all systemically important banks jpmorgan has to get regulatory approval to change its dividend or stock-repurchase plan. the regulators want banks to have enough financial firepower to withstand troubled times before the banks will spend money on share holders. jpmorgan's buyback strategy was suspended this year after it lost $6 billion when a derivative t
sandy. do you have more clarity now? >> i do have clarity on sandy and frankly it's devastating. particularly on individuals. we had 200 of our stores closed for the first three days of the november period and then many more were closed after that because we didn't have power. we definitely were impacted in a major way at our company. >> reporter: for the current quarter you expect to fall short of wall street forecasts by at least five cents. are you still comfortable with those expectations? >> we try to guide honestly and if we're able to exceed that number that's always good news. but we try to guide where we believe we're going to be so we're confident with our forecasts. >> reporter: terry thank you so much. >> thanks ruben. >> tom: while many wal-mart employees spent black friday working the check-out line, others were manning the picket line. they used the high profile shopping day to protest low wages, work schedules and employee benefits. the protests were organized by a union-backed employee group called "our walmart". demonstrations were planned for one thousand stor
update the aftermath of sandy as president obama gets a first hand look at the devastation along new jersey's shoreline. >> ifill: then, how do you plan for increasingly common super storms? ray suarez examines that as part of our series: coping with climate change. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown reports on the battle of the ground game, hard fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
begin their final pitches. the new york marathon cancelled amid suffering after sandy. residents of staten island say they've been forgotten. >> this is new york city, the financial capital of the world. putting right what's happened here is going to take many months and maybe longer. >> and getting ready for new leaders in china. tonight we continue our series of special reports on the challenges they'll face. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now startshe weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have
will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood, it's still waiting for help. welcome to our viewers on public television in america. and also around the globe. for those of you despairing that this presidential election has gone on far too long, good news. it's almost over. the final day of campaigning saw the candidates flying across the country in a last bid for votes. tonight we have comprehensive coverage of how the campaign looks at the very end. the bbc north american editor has been with the obama campaign in wisconsin. he starts our coverage. >> win or lose, it's the last time he'll campaign to save his job. he's chriscrossed a disenchanted nation, traveling 8,000 miles in three days. cajoling voters for giving him another chance. bruce springsteen add as final push. he adds more than star power with songs of the shattered american dreams, of the working american class. ♪ i believed in a promised land ♪ >> he defended the president and explained why that land has prove so hard to reach. >> i'm here today b
from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his si
program. tonight we talk about the aftermath of the empact of hurricane sandy and one of many questions do these hurricanes have something to do with global warming. and mao -- how do we prepare fr them in the 2350u67. joining me bryan walsh of "time" magazine, paul barrett of bloomberg businessweek and steve coll of the new yorker magazine. >> people are not able to live at sea level along these coasts like they have in the past. we have to protect it with walls. >> rose: also this evening we look at some of the responses to hurricane sandy that did work and did save lives. joining me did jon lapook medical correspondent with the cbs evening news with scott pelley. >> we like to stay away from the word miracle, we really do. that's an overused word. i will say when i got there that night, i had the feeling at the pit of my stomach at first when i walked in, i thought oh my, this isn't a movie. we don't know how this is going to end. this could end with death. there were no deaths as far as we know of anybody or catastrophes. >> rose: finally this evening we change courses
-election, just take another look at the widespread havoc caused by the frankenstorm benignly named sandy. having surveyed all this damage "bloomberg business week" concluded: "it's global warming, stupid: if hurricane sandy doesn't persuade americans to get serious about climate change, nothing will." well it was enough to prompt president obama, at his press conference this week, to say more about global warming than he did all year. >> i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacted by human behavior and carbon emissions. and as a consequence, i think we've got an obligation to future generations to do something about it. >> but he made it clear that actually doing something about it will take a back seat to the economy for now. he did return to new york on thursday to review the recovery effort on staten island. climate change and hurricane sandy brought naomi klein to town, too. you may know her as the author of "the shock doctrine: the rise of disaster capitalism." readers of two influential magazines to put naomi klein high on the list of the 100 leading public thinke
sandy. two days have passed since the storm hit landfall late monday night. flooding and storm surge has left unprecedented damage in parts of brooklyn, queens, lower manhattan, and new jersey. at least 46 people are dead and millions are without power as a result of the storm. many new yorkers tried to return to work today but limited transit and power are expected to continue. city officials emphasize that crews are working none stop to help life return to normal. president obama joined governor chris christie earlier in the day to survey the damage to new jersey's coast. >> for those like the people i just had the chance to meet on this block and thought new jersey, throughout the region whose lives have been upended, my second message is we are here for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until you've rebuilt. >> what i said yesterday i really mean. there has got to be sorrow, and you see that, and the president has seen that today, in the eyes and faces of a lot of the folks he's met, and that sorrow is appropriate. we
wall street today. instead, stocks sank on worries that the costs of hurricane sandy will eat into profits. the dow jones industrial average lost 139 points to close at 13,093. the nasdaq fell almost 38 points to close at 2,982. for the week, the dow and the nasdaq were off a fraction of 1%. korean auto makers hyundai and kia could end up paying hundreds of millions of dollars to car owners as compensation for overstating fuel economy. the environmental protection agency now says an audit revealed that 13 models averaged up to six miles a gallon less than advertised. some 900,000 vehicles sold in the last three years are affected. u.s. intelligence officials have rejected claims they failed to answer the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. there've been reports the cia told its security officers to "stand down" and not try to repel the attackers. senior intelligence officials denied that on thursday. they said a security team responded within 25 minutes, even though they were outmanned and outgunned. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >>
of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other waterside cities. the massive force of the storm's destruction along the jersey shore came fully into view today. town after town presented stark scenes of wrecked homes and boats, underscoring the long process of rebuilding that lies ahead. one of those towns was the long beach community north of atlantic city, where army national guard troops arrived to assist. >> a lot of devastation. the island has been hit very hard. from what i understand there is roughly 18,000 homes without power, there is severe gas leaks, so right now we are just trying to get everything together for the office of emergency management here and the different municipalities and just assist them with whatever needs they have going on. >> brown: and even three days later, some long beach residents still could not believe the power of the storm. >> this was the deepest water i have ever seen, in my lifetime of being here. i was 11 in the '62 storm and the water
. >> ifill: the northeast took slow steps toward recovery today, one week after hurricane sandy hit. but for many in new jersey and new york, normal routines are still a long way off. we have two reports, beginning with an overview from kwame holman. >> reporter: it was the closest think to a full-scale morning commute since the storm hit a week ago. it taxed transit systems to the limit in new york city, connecticut and parts of new jersey >> we keep missing trains because it's so packed you can't enter the trains >> reporter: lines stretched for blocks as thousands of people tried to get to work. trains from new jersey to new york remained out, but key subway lines connecting manhattan to brooklyn under the east river were open. and the statten island ferry was running. >> i don't think it's really normal for anyone right now. we have so much on our minds right now especially for those who have family that lost everything, you know. not normal yet. >> reporter: the trarns it challenges came on top of a cold night for thousands of people still without power with temperatures droppi
week after breaking sandy, a polling stations are being set up in many areas. >> election 2012 started cold for karen and john. . and in their basement, flooded by hurricane sandy, is damp and musty. are you thinking about the election? >> is an important in puritan voting is that -- is a part of the american process. -- is an important thing. voting is a part of the american process. >> at a tent, a cardboard sign attached to some voting booths. but i would have voted on a piece of paper and mail it if i had to. >> it is one week since the big storm throughout the power and crippled vast areas. today, there were dumping of the sewage pipes as the army moved into help. >> considering the devastation here it is a wonder that an election can take place at all. but voters and authorities have been determined to make sure it can go ahead. >> in most areas it was business as usual. pacquiao on its feet pretty much in manhattan. -- back on its feet pretty much in manhattan. in new jersey, they can vote at any location. in the coastal suburbs, this has been an election like no other. >> let's
ordered the rationing of gasoline due to a severe shortage caused by super storm sandy, which comes after a second storm has hit the battered area. >> first came hurricane sandy. not only did she bring floodwaters, but the boardwalk, too. it residents did not think it could get worse, but it did. they are now planned -- they are now coping with plunging temperatures. >> it is freezing out here. i can only imagine the older crowd that sits in their project colmes -- in their project homes. it is just freezing. >> this street has been without power for nine days. the residents i've spoken to are not sounding confident that they will get electricity any time soon. in the meantime, they are writing in freezing conditions. the storm affected much of the northeast region, bringing chaos to the airports, as well as the electricity supply. it knocked out power to 50,000 people. what we have found in the streets along with the frustration and large it is a generosity of spirit. the soldiers are national guard volunteers and they are proud of what they do. >> we are here from new york and we are he
searching moment is they still thing that romney was on the rise until hurricane sandy hit. >> is there anything in exit polls that suggests that -- that that froze the race? >> not that it froze the race but 42% of the electorate said that hurricane sandy was a factor or a small factor in their decision and obama carried them handily. i think it goes back if you're talking about the economic question. this economy was not so bad that it guaranteed that the president was going to lose. political scientist that i spoke to said you guys are writing about the unemployment rate being at a historically high level for someone to try to get re-elected or that the growth rates are lukewarm, anemic but in reality it was enough not to guarantee election but to get him over the top. and if you look at the exit polls again, he did not lose the economic argument. he didn't win it decisively but governor romney didn't win it decisively. gwen: we promised you that there would be truth and consequence. first up, for the president and the house speaker as the government faces mandatory year
struggling to recover after a storm sandy. he went to new york for the first time with the devastation and that with families, officials, and first responders. it has been 2.5 years since an explosion on an oil rig in the gulf of mexico killed 11 people and unleashed a massive spill. bp has agreed to pay $4.5 billion and will plead guilty to criminal charges. the announcement was made by the u.s. attorney general who traveled to new orleans for the event. >> already, this oil spill is the worst environmental disaster america has ever faced. >> many people are dead, millions of gallons of oil continued to spew into the gulf. >> it is 2.5 years since the deepwater horizon will real -- will break exploded -- oil rig exploded. bp reached a settlement with the u.s. government. they have pleaded guilty to 14 criminal charges, 11 of them for misconduct. the company will pay a total of $4.5 billion in fines and compensation. two bp employees have also been charged with manslaughter. the american government says bp failed to take adequate precautions and when not rule out further efforts to see
benefits jumped to a one-and-a-half year high, surging 78,000, thanks to super- storm sandy. the total was 439,000. meantime, consumer inflation slowed to a one tenth of a percent increase, thanks to lower energy prices. without food and energy, core inflation was up two tenths of a percent. on wall street, the dow fell 28.5 points, the nasdaq was down almost ten, and the s&p 500 dropped two. if you want to know how the economy is faring, it pays to keep an eye on walmart. after all, it has over 10,000 stores across the globe, selling more than $1 billion worth of stuff every day. it earned $1.08 per share in the third quarter, a penny more than estimates, and up 11% from last year. but revenues were a little shy of forecast, and walmart's outlook for this quarter was less than anticipated. compare that to rival target's quarterly earnings-- four cents better than expectations at 81 cents a share and a holiday outlook that didn't disappoint. erika miller reports on what the results say about all-important the holiday season. >> reporter: $3.6 billion. that almost unthinkable number is
digits ahead here. we know that. and with the impact of sandy, we don't really know how it's going to affect the popular vote on the east coast. >> belva: that is the storm. >> the storm, the hurricane. new jersey, you're talking about, new york, i'm hearing ohio there's some effects. this could be an issue. we really -- this is a -- could be a cliff hanger. >> belva: we seem to be able to talk about most things, very little about issues in this whole election cycle, because there's been such a predominant tax and other groups contributing to races. again, we feel the ping of money when it comes to the congressional race. >> absolutely. and sacramento in particular has been an incredible hot bed of spending on congressional races because there are actually four pretty well contested races that sort of fall within that media market. there's the seventh district, where republican incumbent dan lundgren is in serious trouble as democratic challenger takes a second bite at the apple and that's considered a tossup race. jerry mcnearny is the only democratic incumbent who is considered t
results don't even include the sales lift from superstorm sandy. home depot also raised its profit outlook for the year. if housing continues to improve, experts say it's a bullish sign for the rest of the economy. >> now, as we start to see residential investment recovery, that should help other sectors of the economy through demand for building materials, through more demand for other products-- furniture, you name it! >> reporter: she's optimistic housing will remain one of the few bright spots in an otherwise sluggish recovery. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: it was an unhappy earnings story in the third quarter for saks. the upscale department store said sales and profits were hurt by a modest spike in promotions. on top of that, saks expects sales to be flat in the current holiday period because of a slow start to november due to hurricane sandy. noow, trouble at saks underscores new worries spreading throughout the luxury sector about the all important holiday season. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: on manhattan's 5th avenue, it's beginning to look a lot like christm
slid 0.3% in october, more than expected, and the first decline in three months. hurricane sandy was behind at least some of the sales decline. but there are fresh worries today about the underlying strength of the american consumer. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: hurricane sandy is going to get blamed a lot in the coming weeks for soft economic data. and, rightfully so. after all the superstorm paralyzed a good chunk of the northeast for at least a week. that meant, no shopping, no eating out, and no filling up the tank. >> clearly, the retail sales data were weak and they were weak across a lot of categories. the commerce dept did talk about the affects on hurricane sandy on the numbers. but, it's hard to quantify. >> reporter: the question is whether that consumer paralysis will continue into the all important holiday retail season. many economists say that really depends on whether americans feel secure in the their jobs. here's the good news: there has recently been some improvement on the labor front. on top of that, many shoppers are finding their wallets are thicker
spiking because of hurricane sandy. that's welcome relief to many drivers, but it still costs more to fill up your tank now compared to a year ago. erika miller reports from one of the most expensive cities to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas, prices spiked more than ten cents a gallon. but now, the situation has drastically improved here and around the country. regular unleaded costs an average of $3.42 nationwide. that's 12 cents below where it was a month ago. but drivers are still paying about 12 cents more for gas today than a year ago. a big reason is escalating middle east tensions. >> anytime you have that kind of conflict in the middle east, whether it's the israelis or the egyptians, the syrians, it really the disruption of flow, you know. any
spending and stronger u.s. exports also helped. the impact super-storm sandy has had on the job market seems to be dissipating. 23,000 fewer americans filed for first-time unemployment benefits during thanksgiving week compared to a week earlier. the total was 393,000. it had jumped to over 400,000 in the weeks following the storm. still, we saw just modest gains on wall street today-- the dow rose 36 points, the nasdaq was up 20, and the s&p 500 added six. >> tom: the roster of companies announcing special one-time paydays for their shareholders continued growing today. taxes on stock dividends are currently set at 15%. but with no deal on the fiscal cliff, dividends will be taxed like regular income, meaning they could go up to over 40% for some high-income households. we spoke with larry mendelson, the chairman and c.e.o. at avionics gear maker heico, which announced its own special dividend this week. larry, thank you for joining us, we appreciate it. what role did the fiscal cliff play in heico decision to paid fiscal dividend. >> i think the fiscal cliff was very important. and m
the northeast today with wind, water and snow. its arrival came just over a week after hurricane sandy battered the region. police cars in new york city patrolled low-lying neighborhoods, urging people to evacuate again. the approaching nor'easter brought a wintry mix of cold and snow and possibly, minor flooding in already damaged coastal areas. new york mayor michael bloomberg: >> we haven't and won't order the kind of large scale evacuation we ordered in advance of hurricane sandy but if you are experiencing significant flooding during sandy you should consider taking shelter with friends and family at a safer spot or using one of the city's storm center shelters. >> sreenivasan: in new jersey, thousands of storm-weary people braced for their brush with the new storm, even as cleanup efforts continued from "sandy". governor chris christie suggested it was a little like the biblical plagues. >> when i finally got that final kind of, forecast that i got last night, i said i'm waiting for the locusts and pestilence next, you know. >> sreenivasan: the storm could also bring wind gusts of 65 mile
york, a man in the middle of the response to hurricane sandy. >> the scope of the damage, it looked to me t reminded me of vietnam-- veeted nam, seeing areas that were bombed out, you know, the b-52 bombings. obviously didn't have the structures there that we have here but just wide swathe of damage. >> it always happens in somebody else's backyard n the midwest or south. but something like this would just not anticipated and could not have been anticipated based on our history. >> rose: also this evening the last political weekend before the election on tuesday, we talk with john dickerson the political director of cbs news. >> ohio is still the granddaddy of them all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nev
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)